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At 1:07pm on February 2, 2010, Joshua Flores said…
Hi Adam, first of all let me say I’m very excited to know you’ll be helping me develop a trading game plan that works for me. Ok now let me tell you my schedule and what I think I need help on. I work from 6am-4:15pm with a 2 hour lunch break from 11am-1pm. Throughout my lunch break I take my notebook to work and spend some time working on my demo account because I don’t have much time in the morning. Plus in about 2 or 3 weeks I will be starting a second job from 5:30pm-6:30pm as a boxing instructor. Now that’s my schedule from Mon-Fri so obviously on the weekends I try to relax as much as I can. My main goal for having this software is to be able to do this full-time but if I can make at least an extra $1,000.00 or more a month working around my current schedule I’ll be happy only because I know it’ll only be a matter of time until I can do this full-time as my main business which is my ultimate goal.
As for my trading well I’m trading on a 15min time frame and after listening to James Dicks Webinar from October of 2008. He mentioned that most traders only look at 4 major pairs and don’t spend more than 4 hours on a computer a day. So I started focusing on the EUR/USD and so far that’s the only one I’ve been trying to understand. For example today from 11am to 12:45pm it went up almost 15 pips. But I didn’t see eat coming, mainly all four points weren’t in the green. So I ask you am I looking at the right time frame for someone like me? Should I look as many pairs as I can in the little free time that I have? My last 3 attempts trading in this pair with my demo account weren’t so bad 2 out of 3 I made just under 20 pips each and I lost 15 pips on my third attempt. So what changes can I make to help me with my game plan?
At 10:43am on October 21, 2009, Adam Horak added a gift to their profile…
Gift
you know its the 24th happy b day to me
At 10:43am on October 21, 2009, Adam Horak added a gift to their profile…
Gift
im a supporter
At 11:10pm on January 2, 2009, Dr Chris said…
Yeah..me too....i make that face all the time. I must admit that the picture is not really ME. It is my dad.(he takes a better pic than me). Anyway wishing you a great and posper new year. Take Care.

DrChris
At 12:32pm on October 21, 2008, Dino Rampersaud said…
Hey Adam, I listen to your morning show everyday. You give great advice. Your show help me regain my confidence after making alot of trading mistakes in the past. Now thanks to you I'm back in the game. Thanks again.Dino
At 11:59pm on August 6, 2008, Constance Crawford said…
Greetings Adam, I have been trading with Premiere Trade off and on for the last year and find the webinars very informative and helpful - especially the 07:00 am and the new 10:00 am show. Keep up the good work and Thanks a Million.
At 8:05pm on August 4, 2008, Randy Orr said…
Thanks for noticing my picture. I was so overwhelmed with the beauty of the Hawaii, I forgot to hit the ball. By the way, I think what you are doing is great and I love the Forex. Thanks for the tips.
At 1:38pm on August 1, 2008, Michael Stevens said…
Hey adam my name is mike i've been trading with Premiere trade / forex market for about 16 month i ran throught alot of system and really havent found that one were i hv at least 80% winning trades. I really like trading of the "charting platform" can you refer me to a radio broadcast were they discuse different systems
At 10:15pm on July 29, 2008, Dr Chris said…
Yeah adam//that was funny. That was the closest pic i had. That is what i look like in the morning. Looking forward to the Usd strength tomorrow.
At 5:13pm on July 24, 2008, Jim said…
Thanks, A. That makes much more conservative sense. So you never have more than 5% of your trading account at risk at any given time. Whether one trade or five, the total money between purchase and stop loss is 5%. If you lose money on a trade, the money at risk on the next trade is less since you are using 5% of the new, lower balance. Correct?

I see this will make your account grow slower if I'm right but last longer if I'm wrong. Good advice - thx.
At 9:45am on July 16, 2008, Adam Horak said…
CONSUMER PRICE INDEX: JUNE 2008

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased
1.0 percent in June, before seasonal adjustment, the Bureau of Labor
Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor reported today. The June level
of 218.815 (1982-84=100) was 5.0 percent higher than in June 2007.

The Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers
(CPI-W) increased 1.1 percent in June, prior to seasonal adjustment. The
June level of 215.223 (1982-84=100) was 5.6 percent higher than in June
2007.

The Chained Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U)
increased 0.8 percent in June on a not seasonally adjusted basis. The
June level of 125.582 (December 1999=100) was 4.2 percent higher than in
June 2007. Please note that the indexes for the post-2006 period are
subject to revision.

CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)

On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI-U advanced 1.1 percent in
June, following a 0.6 percent increase in May. The index for energy rose
sharply for the second straight month, increasing 6.6 percent in June
following a 4.4 percent increase in May. The increase in the energy index
accounted for around two-thirds of the overall increase in the all items
index in June. The index for petroleum-based energy advanced 10.0 percent
and the index for energy services rose 1.5 percent. The food index rose
0.8 percent in June after rising 0.3 percent in May. The index for food
at home went up 1.0 percent in June, with indexes for four of the six
major grocery store food groups sharply accelerating. The index for all
items less food and energy increased 0.3 percent in June, following a 0.1
percent rise in April and a 0.2 percent increase in May. Larger increases
in the indexes for shelter and for tobacco and smoking products and an
upturn in the apparel index contributed to the larger increase.

Table A. Percent changes in CPI for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U)


Seasonally adjusted


Expenditure Compound
Category Changes from preceding month annual Un-
rate adjusted
3-mos. 12-mos.
Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. May June ended ended
2007 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 2008 June 2008 June 2008

All items.......... .4 .4 .0 .3 .2 .6 1.1 7.9 5.0
Food and beverages .1 .7 .4 .2 .9 .3 .7 8.1 5.2
Housing........... .3 .2 .2 .4 .3 .5 .5 5.2 3.5
Apparel........... .1 .4 -.3 -1.3 .5 -.3 .1 1.0 -.2
Transportation.... 1.0 .5 -.7 .7 -.7 2.0 3.8 22.3 12.0
Medical care...... .3 .5 .1 .1 .2 .2 .2 2.1 4.0
Recreation........ .0 .2 .1 .3 -.1 .1 .1 .6 1.3
Education and
communication.. .3 .4 .1 .3 .4 .4 .5 5.1 3.4
Other goods and
services....... .3 .4 .2 .4 .5 .4 .4 5.2 3.8
Special indexes:
Energy............ 1.7 .7 -.5 1.9 .0 4.4 6.6 53.6 24.7
Food.............. .1 .7 .4 .2 .9 .3 .8 8.5 5.3
All items less
food and energy .2 .3 .0 .2 .1 .2 .3 2.5 2.4

Consumer prices advanced at a seasonally adjusted annualized rate
(SAAR) of 7.9 percent in the second quarter after increasing at a 3.1
percent rate in the first three months of 2008. This brings the year-to-
date annual rate to 5.5 percent and compares with an increase of 4.1
percent in all of 2007. The index for energy increased at a 29.1 percent
SAAR in the first half of 2008, accounting for around half of the advance
in the all items CPI-U during that period. Energy commodities increased
at a 34.7 percent rate and energy services rose at a 20.1 percent rate.
The food index rose at a 6.8 percent SAAR in the first half of 2008,
accounting for about one-sixth of the overall CPI-U increase in the
period. The food at home index increased at an 8.7 percent annual rate in
the first half of 2008, compared to a 5.6 percent increase for all of
2007. Four of the six major groups accelerated over last year. The
increases ranged from annual rates of 15.5 percent for the index for
cereal and bakery products to 5.2 percent for the index for meats, poultry
fish and eggs.

The CPI-U excluding food and energy increased at a 2.5 percent SAAR
in the second quarter after rising at a 2.0 percent rate in the first
three months of 2008. The advance at a 2.3 percent SAAR over the first
six months of 2008 compares with an increase of 2.4 percent in all of
2007. Deceleration in the shelter and medical care indexes and a larger
rate of decline in the apparel index more than offset acceleration in the
indexes for recreation, education and communication, and other goods and
services. The shelter index increased at a 2.2 percent SAAR after
increasing 3.1 percent in 2007 while the apparel index declined at a 1.9
percent rate after falling 0.3 percent in 2007. The annual rates for
selected groups for the last seven-and-one-half years are shown below.

Percentage change 12 months SAAR 6
ended in December mos.
ended
June
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

All items........... 1.6 2.4 1.9 3.3 3.4 2.5 4.1 5.5
Food and beverages 2.8 1.5 3.5 2.6 2.3 2.2 4.8 6.6
Housing............ 2.9 2.4 2.2 3.0 4.0 3.3 3.0 4.3
Apparel............ -3.2 -1.8 -2.1 -.2 -1.1 .9 -.3 -1.9
Transportation..... -3.8 3.8 .3 6.5 4.8 1.6 8.3 11.9
Medical care....... 4.7 5.0 3.7 4.2 4.3 3.6 5.2 2.7
Recreation......... 1.5 1.1 1.1 .7 1.1 1.0 .8 1.5
Education and
communication..... 3.2 2.2 1.6 1.5 2.4 2.3 3.0 4.1
Other goods and
services.......... 4.5 3.3 1.5 2.5 3.1 3.0 3.3 4.8
Special indexes:
Energy............. -13.0 10.7 6.9 16.6 17.1 2.9 17.4 29.1
Energy commodities -24.5 23.7 6.9 26.7 16.7 6.1 29.4 34.7
Energy services... -1.5 .4 6.9 6.8 17.6 -.6 3.4 20.1
All items less
energy............ 2.8 1.8 1.5 2.2 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.0
Food.............. 2.8 1.5 3.6 2.7 2.3 2.1 4.9 6.8
All items less food
and energy........ 2.7 1.9 1.1 2.2 2.2 2.6 2.4 2.3

The food and beverages index rose 0.7 percent in June. The index for
food at home increased 1.0 percent, following a 0.3 percent rise in May.
Four of the six major grocery store food group indexes accelerated in
June. The index for fruits and vegetables, which was virtually unchanged
in May, rose 2.8 percent in June. The index for fresh vegetables rose 6.1
percent in June and the indexes for fresh fruit and for processed fruits
and vegetables increased 0.8 percent and 1.2 percent, respectively. The
index for dairy and related products increased 1.6 percent in June after a
0.1 percent decline in May. The index for meats, poultry fish and eggs
rose 0.8 percent in June after a 0.1 percent increase in May. The beef
and veal index increased sharply for the second month in a row, up 1.7
percent in June after a 1.5 percent increase in May. The pork index
turned up, increasing 0.6 percent in June after declining 0.8 percent the
previous month. The index for eggs increased 1.4 percent in June after a
3.8 percent decrease in May and is 23.2 percent higher than in June 2007.
The index for nonalcoholic beverages and beverage materials rose 0.2
percent in June after a 0.9 percent decline in May. The two decelerating
groups were cereals and bakery products, increasing 0.5 percent in June
after a 1.6 percent rise in May, and other food at home, up 0.4 percent in
June after a 0.5 percent increase in May. The indexes for food away from
home and for alcoholic beverages increased 0.5 and 0.1 percent,
respectively.

The index for housing rose 0.5 percent in June, the same increase as
the previous month. The index for shelter increased 0.3 percent,
following a 0.2 percent rise in May and a 0.1 percent increase in April.
Within shelter, the indexes for rent and owners' equivalent rent increased
0.4 and 0.3 percent, respectively. The index for lodging away from home
increased 0.7 percent in June. The index for household energy registered
its fifth consecutive large increase, increasing 2.1 percent in June. The
index for fuel oil rose 10.4 percent for the second consecutive month and
is 78.0 percent higher than in June 2007. The index for electricity,
after increasing for three consecutive months, declined 0.1 percent in
June. The index for natural gas increased sharply for the fifth
consecutive month, rising 4.9 percent in June and is up 21.5 percent over
the last 12 months. The index for household furnishings and operations
was virtually unchanged in June after increasing 0.2 percent in May.

The transportation index advanced 3.8 percent in June, reflecting
large increases in the indexes for motor fuel and public transportation.
The index for gasoline rose 10.1 percent, accounting for slightly more
than half of the total advance in the all items index, and was 32.8
percent higher than in June 2007. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, gasoline
prices in June rose 7.9 percent above their previous peak level recorded
in May.) The index for new vehicles turned up in June, increasing 0.2
percent after a 0.1 percent decline in May; the new vehicles index is down
1.0 percent over the last 12 months. The index for used cars and trucks
declined 0.3 percent in June, the third consecutive decrease, but is up
0.7 percent over June 2007. The index for public transportation advanced
3.4 percent in June, reflecting a 4.5 percent increase in the index for
airline fares. (Prior to seasonal adjustment, airline fares rose 6.7
percent and were 18.7 percent higher than a year ago.)

The index for apparel rose 0.1 percent in June following a 0.3
percent decline in May. Prior to seasonal adjustment, apparel prices
declined 3.1 percent in June and are 0.2 percent lower than in June 2007.
Over the last year, women's and girls' apparel prices declined 3.3 percent
while prices for men's and boys' apparel rose 1.0 percent.

Medical care costs rose 0.2 percent in June, and are 4.0 percent
higher than a year ago. The index for medical care commodities--
prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and medical supplies-increased
0.1 percent in June after a 0.7 percent decline in May. The index for
medical care services increased 0.3 percent in June after a 0.5 percent
increase in May. This reflected a deceleration in the index for
professional services, which increased 0.3 percent in June after a 0.7
percent increase in May. The index for hospital and related services
increased 0.4 percent in June.

The index for recreation was increased 0.1 percent in June, the same
percent change as in May. Increases in the indexes for pets, pet products
and services and for sporting goods more than offset declines in the
indexes for video and audio, for toys, and for admissions.

The index for education and communication increased 0.5 percent in
June. Educational costs rose 0.4 percent and the index for communication
costs rose 0.6 percent. Within the latter category, the index for
delivery services increased 2.1 percent and long distance land-line
telephone charges increased 3.3 percent. These increases were partially
offset by a 0.5 percent decline in the index for information technology,
hardware and services.

The index for other goods and services increased 0.4 percent in June.
The index for tobacco and smoking products rose 1.5 percent, accounting
for over 80 percent of the increase in this group. The index for personal
care increased 0.1 percent.


CPI for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W)

On a seasonally adjusted basis, the CPI for Urban Wage Earners and
Clerical Workers increased 1.2 percent in June.

Percentage change 12 months SAAR 6
ended in December mos.
ended
June
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

All items........... 1.6 2.4 1.9 3.3 3.4 2.5 4.1 5.5
Food and beverages 2.8 1.5 3.5 2.6 2.3 2.2 4.8 6.6
Housing............ 2.9 2.4 2.2 3.0 4.0 3.3 3.0 4.3
Apparel............ -3.2 -1.8 -2.1 -.2 -1.1 .9 -.3 -1.9
Transportation..... -3.8 3.8 .3 6.5 4.8 1.6 8.3 11.9
Medical care....... 4.7 5.0 3.7 4.2 4.3 3.6 5.2 2.7
Recreation......... 1.5 1.1 1.1 .7 1.1 1.0 .8 1.5
Education and
communication..... 3.2 2.2 1.6 1.5 2.4 2.3 3.0 4.1
Other goods and
services.......... 4.5 3.3 1.5 2.5 3.1 3.0 3.3 4.8
Special indexes:
Energy............. -13.0 10.7 6.9 16.6 17.1 2.9 17.4 29.1
Energy commodities -24.5 23.7 6.9 26.7 16.7 6.1 29.4 34.7
Energy services... -1.5 .4 6.9 6.8 17.6 -.6 3.4 20.1
All items less
energy............ 2.8 1.8 1.5 2.2 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.0
Food.............. 2.8 1.5 3.6 2.7 2.3 2.1 4.9 6.8
All items less food
and energy........ 2.7 1.9 1.1 2.2 2.2 2.6 2.4 2.3


Consumer Price Index data for July are scheduled for release on
Thursday, August 14, 2008, at 8:30 A.M. (EDT).



Facilities for Sensory Impaired

Information from this release will be made available to sensory
impaired individuals upon request. Voice phone: 202-691-5200, Federal
Relay Services: 1-800-877-8339.

Brief Explanation of the CPI

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) is a measure of the average change in
prices over time of goods and services purchased by households. The Bureau
of Labor Statistics publishes CPIs for two population groups: (1) the CPI
for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W), which covers
households of wage earners and clerical workers that comprise approximately
32 percent of the total population and (2) the CPI for All Urban Consumers
(CPI-U) and the Chained CPI for All Urban Consumers (C-CPI-U), which cover
approximately 87 percent of the total population and include in addition to
wage earners and clerical worker households, groups such as professional,
managerial, and technical workers, the self-employed, short-term workers,
the unemployed, and retirees and others not in the labor force.

The CPIs are based on prices of food, clothing, shelter, and fuels,
transportation fares, charges for doctors' and dentists' services, drugs,
and other goods and services that people buy for day-to-day living. Prices
are collected in 87 urban areas across the country from about 50,000
housing units and approximately 23,000 retail establishments-department
stores, supermarkets, hospitals, filling stations, and other types of
stores and service establishments. All taxes directly associated with the
purchase and use of items are included in the index. Prices of fuels and a
few other items are obtained every month in all 87 locations. Prices of
most other commodities and services are collected every month in the three
largest geographic areas and every other month in other areas. Prices of
most goods and services are obtained by personal visits or telephone calls
of the Bureau's trained representatives.

In calculating the index, price changes for the various items in each
location are averaged together with weights, which represent their
importance in the spending of the appropriate population group. Local data
are then combined to obtain a U.S. city average. For the CPI-U and CPI-W
separate indexes are also published by size of city, by region of the
country, for cross-classifications of regions and population-size classes,
and for 27 local areas. Area indexes do not measure differences in the
level of prices among cities; they only measure the average change in
prices for each area since the base period. For the C-CPI-U data are
issued only at the national level. It is important to note that the CPI-U
and CPI-W are considered final when released, but the C-CPI-U is issued in
preliminary form and subject to two annual revisions.

The index measures price change from a designed reference date. For
the CPI-U and the CPI-W the reference base is 1982-84 equals 100.0. The
reference base for the C-CPI-U is December 1999 equals 100.
An increase of 16.5 percent from the reference base, for example, is shown
as 116.5. This change can also be expressed in dollars as follows: the
price of a base period market basket of goods and services in the CPI has
risen from $10 in 1982-84 to $11.65.
At 10:43am on July 15, 2008, Adam Horak said…
Traders often ask me where are some of the best places to obtain up to the minute economic releases. A couple reliable sources are Premiere Trade Training under the News and resource center...
I also like to get the information directly from the BOL Bureau of Labor static’s http://www.bls.gov/home.htm is the link this will give you the actual release.

Adam

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